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73 videos are tagged with elixir

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 63 times
Recorded at: April 24, 2015
Date Posted: October 12, 2015

Phoenix is an Elixir framework for building scalable web applications with realtime connectivity across all your devices. Together, we’ll take a guided tour of the framework, going from the very basics, to building our own realtime applications. You’ll see the framework’s foundations, core components, and how to use Phoenix to write powerful web services.
Tutorial objectives:
We’ll start by exploring the foundations of the framework in Elixir’s Plug library, followed by the core components of Phoenix’s Router and Controller layers. Next, we’ll review the View layer and build an application together as we learn each concept. We’ll finish by using the PubSub layer to add realtime functionality to our application. Along the way, attendees will see how to apply advanced features like router pipelines and plug middelware and receive tips on how to structure a Phoenix application for real-world services.
Prerequisites:
The audience for this talk is any Elixir or Erlang programmer looking to dive into Phoenix and learn how to build powerful applications quickly and easily. Attendees should have an introductory level experience with Elixir or Erlang and the ability to run Elixir on their laptops.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 96 times
Recorded at: April 24, 2015
Date Posted: October 12, 2015

We'll live-code the game of Tetris from scratch, culminating in a browser-based tetris game that multiple audience members can connect to and control collaboratively.

Target audience:

- Elixir beginners through intermediates

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 144 times
Recorded at: April 24, 2015
Date Posted: October 12, 2015

Bold Poker is a Phoenix-based web application with a Elixir game server. iOS and Android clients connect to the using WebSockets.

We give a short introduction to OTP releases and talk about what can be done in order to use releases without having to manually write app upgrade files.

We talk about how we use our open-source Erlang and Elixir deployment tool edeliver. Edeliver is a deployment tool that uses OTP releases to deploy both our Elixir Gameserver as well as our Phoenix web app.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 112 times
Recorded at: April 24, 2015
Date Posted: October 12, 2015

Have you ever wondered about why you might use multiple levels of supervisors, or when you might use a strategy other than one_for_one? What about practical examples of how you might do a live code update? Or how to send code down to a node that just joined a cluster? Rudimentary, but effective, failover between cluster nodes? I created an Internet Relay Chat (IRC) bot-OhaiBot-to explore each of these topics. I'll do a walkthrough of the design, running, and update of the bot, focusing not necessarily on OhaiBot, but on why and how I came to certain solutions. No previous knowledge of IRC is necessary. Audience participation, particularly for the clustering aspects, is encouraged.

Target audience:

- Beginners

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 261 times
Recorded at: April 24, 2015
Date Posted: October 12, 2015

Bleacher Report is the second largest sport website in the world. At peak times we reach 80 million unique users per month and serve over 100,000 requests per minute to our mobile apps alone. In the past we scaled by adding caching layers, relying heavily on in-memory databases and pre-built content. However as we strive to further individualize the user experience we can no longer rely on caching alone. In elixir and phoenix we found the technology that allowed us to build concurrent api web-servers in an easily approachable language. It complements our existing infrastructure nicely, which is using Ruby on Rails. The performance gains over Ruby allow us to move from a cached-based to a real-time strategy. This talk will give an overview over the caveats we found and how the numbers are showing that we found the right tool for the job.

Target audience:

- Software engineers interested in scaling non-cacheable websites

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 301 times
Recorded at: April 24, 2015
Date Posted: October 12, 2015

This talk will quickly introduce Ecto for unfamiliar audience members. Ecto recently underwent some major changes with improvements from the lessons learnt after it was first created almost two years ago. Eric will talk about some of the design choices made in Ecto and what sets it apart from traditional ORMs.

Target audience:

Elixir developers interested in Ecto

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 169 times
Recorded at: October 23, 2015
Date Posted: October 12, 2015

Rewriting a Ruby application in Elixir
Dragonfly is a fairly popular Ruby library to manage file uploads and it includes a Rack server to serve those files back. This talk is a postmortem of a rewrite of this server component in Elixir, so that it can be used to process Dragonfly-compatible urls with improved performance. The talk will focus on the structure of the application, managing pools of workers, pattern matching to simplify complex Ruby logic, interacting with external tools (like streaming data back and forth from Imagemagick) and deployment considerations.

Target audience: Beginners - Medium

Benjamin tan thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 3,523 times
Recorded at: June 26, 2014
Date Posted: July 21, 2014

As developers, we know that we should use the right tool for the right job. While we may love Ruby, there are also many interesting technologies that may complement our favourite programming language.

This talk introduces Elixir, a programming language that is built on the legendary Erlang virtual machine. I will first give a quick walk through of the language, focusing on core concepts such as concurrency and fault tolerance - areas where Elixir shines.

After that, we will dive straight in to an example application to see how Ruby can exploit the powerful features of Elixir. More importantly, the audience would realise that there's more to Ruby than just Ruby.

It will be a fun ride!

Dave thomas thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 20,351 times
Recorded at: July 19, 2013
Date Posted:

Dave Thomas
Elixir: Power of Erlang, Joy of Ruby

I’m a language nut. I love trying them out, and I love thinking about their design and implementation. (I know, it’s sad.)

I came across Ruby in 1998 because I was an avid reader of comp.lang.misc (ask your parents). I downloaded it, compiled it, and fell in love. As with any time you fall in love, it’s difficult to explain why. It just worked the way I work, and it had enough depth to keep me interested.

Fast forward 15 years. All that time I’d been looking for something new that gave me the same feeling.

Then I came across Elixir, a language by José Valim, that puts a humane, Ruby-like syntax on the Erlang VM.

Now I’m dangerous. I want other people to see just how great this is. I want to evangelize. I won't try to convert you away from Ruby. But I might just persuade you to add Elixir to your toolset.

So come along and let me show you the things that I think make Elixir a serious alternative for writing highly reliable, scalable, and performant server code.

And, more important, let me show you some fun stuff.

Rating: Everyone
Viewed 115 times
Recorded at: May 13, 2014
Date Posted: December 18, 2014

Object-oriented programmers can have a dogmatic approach to language patterns. Whether it is analyzing, debating or criticizing various implementations, the passion for patterns emerges from the need to both communicate intent and categorize code. The patterns do more than define code, they describe it. So, what happens when we lose objects? When state fades away? When paradigms shift far more than a change in languages?

In steps Elixir. With syntax similar to Ruby but firmly grounded in the functional paradigm, it represents an easy transition for Rubyist into functional programming. But what about the beloved patterns? It turns out that understanding how functional languages implement some of the common object-oriented patterns can demystify this new paradigm. Plus learning new functional patterns can provide new solutions to old problems.