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Windy City Rails 2011 Schedule

September 17, 2011

( 7 available presentations )
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 539 times
Recorded at: September 17, 2011
Date Posted: December 17, 2012

Great developers are on a constant quest for knowledge, and knowledge begins with questions. “Do I need to learn about EventMachine or node.js? Can I use threads? What is so good or bad about threading in Ruby 1.8, Ruby 1.9, JRuby and Rubinius 2.0? What choices do I need to make, how different does my code look, and how do I do testing?”

Dr. Nic Williams has approached many developers with these questions. He even hosted EM RubyConf during RailsConf 2011 in order to gather the brightest minds in the Ruby community. Join Dr. Nic as he shares answers gathered during this recent quest for knowledge.

John mccaffey thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 518 times
Recorded at: September 17, 2011
Date Posted: December 17, 2012

Most developers know how to improve initial page load performance. We know how to follow recommendations from tools like yslow and page speed. Still, we struggle with slow performance after pages are loaded.

This talk will review:

* The basic rules from yslow/page speed (and when to break them)
* Tools for finding bottlenecks and slow javascript
* Common javascript performance patterns and how to fix them
* Architectural and design approaches to improve performance
* Considerations for Mobile performance
* Performance features in HTML5 and Rails 3

John McCaffrey has been developing applications since 1998, and is passionate about improving application performance and software development performance. John is an independent consultant focusing on bringing Rails applications to market quickly.

Tom preston thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 702 times
Recorded at: September 17, 2011
Date Posted: December 17, 2012

It has been said that software development is a constant battle against complexity. GitHub has built several large systems over the past three years, all while engaging in the proverbial battle against complexity. Things like tight coupling, insufficient testing or documentation, lack of versioning discipline, and underspecified design documents can easily lead developers down a path of ruin. This talk will cover many of the techniques GitHub uses to defend against complexity in Ruby systems, including Readme Driven Development, Semantic Versioning, TomDoc, Git/GitHub workflow, modularization, metrics, and exception reporting.

Tom Preston-Werner is a cofounder of GitHub, the social coding phenomenon that has captured the imaginations of hackers around the globe. He is also a serial entrepreneur having sold Gravatar to Automattic and run a web/graphic design firm, Cube6 Media, out of San Diego.z

David kinney thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 551 times
Recorded at: September 17, 2011
Date Posted: December 17, 2012

JavaScript is the assembly language of the web, and the first generation of higher-level languages built on top of that foundation has arrived. CoffeeScript is an exciting entry in this nascent field, embracing the best of JavaScript, extending it with collection operators, and wrapping it all in a more succinct, Ruby-ish grammar. CoffeeScript’s benefits have proven so compelling that it is supported in the core of Rails 3.1. We will introduce CoffeeScript’s core syntax – starting with a JavaScript function and tearing it apart until it’s an elegant few lines of CoffeeScript. Then we will cover CoffeeScript’s improvements for object-oriented programming, and finally review how CoffeeScript is used in a Rails 3.1 project.

David is a Software Architect at Redpoint Technologies and the lead organizer for SecondConf. His professional web application developer career traces back more than a decade, originally writing Apache modules and PERL CGI scripts, then adopting Java in its infancy, jumping to Ruby shortly after Rails went 1.0, and now investigating Node.js, SproutCore, and CouchDB. In his free time, David hacks on Arduino projects with his daughter and frequents local meetups.

Aaron kalin thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 478 times
Recorded at: September 17, 2011
Date Posted: December 17, 2012

Steve klabnik thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 569 times
Recorded at: September 17, 2011
Date Posted: December 17, 2012

We have many metaphors for software: Code as art, code as craft, code as science. Steve finds another one particularly useful: Code as literature. As one example, when writing prose, you must consider your audience. When writing software, several audiences will ‘read’ your work: the computer, your teammates, and end-users. Documentation must be written for multiple audiences as well. This is just one example of the parallel between the two.

In this talk, Steve will discuss programming as an act of composition, and how this mindset can be used to improve the code you write. He’ll point out some of the unique problems that composing software brings to the table, and how to address them.

Steve is a Ruby Hero, software craftsman, and an aspiring digital humanities scholar. He spends most of his time contributing to Open Source projects, and maintains both Hackety Hack and Shoes.

Lightning thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 466 times
Recorded at: September 17, 2011
Date Posted: December 17, 2012