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RailsPacific 2016 Schedule

May 20 - 21, 2016

( 14 available presentations )
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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 514 times
Recorded at: May 20, 2016
Date Posted: June 9, 2016

I'm by no means the best programmer (Most people probably wouldn't even consider me an expert) but I've managed to build and run a few successful software businesses. I created juicer.io, a social media aggregator, and I've attended YCombinator for another business.

My talk will be about the history of Juicer: why I started it, how I got there, and how I grew it. I'll also focus on the benefits of business ownership as opposed to traditional software engineering jobs. Finally I'll give my advice that I've learned through brute force and trial and error about idea generation, building, and most importantly growing a software based business.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 202 times
Recorded at: May 20, 2016
Date Posted: June 9, 2016

Computer Science education has been undergoing rapid transformation in recent years. The rise of code schools, bootcamps, online courses and other self-learning resources on the Internet have opened up a variety of new avenues alongside the more traditional paths. In this talk, we will explore how good programmers think, the key skills that helps them do their job and how our education system could help our students get there.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 188 times
Recorded at: May 20, 2016
Date Posted: June 9, 2016

When things go right and our product starts making money everyone is happy, but sometimes this means the start of the nightmare for people working with payments.

Let's not sugar coat it. In this talk you'll learn about some where thing went terribly wrong, some of them involved loosing money. Stories of stuff that can easily get overlooked, about the most common mistakes when working with payments and things you probably won't consider until shit hits the fan. All of this so that you don't run into the same problems and don't have to learn those lessons the hard way.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 307 times
Recorded at: May 20, 2016
Date Posted: June 9, 2016

Don’t you hate when testing takes 3x as long because your specs are hard to understand? Following a few simple patterns, you can easily take a bloated spec and make it DRY and simple to extend. We will take a bloated sample spec and refactor it to something manageable, readable and concise.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 168 times
Recorded at: May 20, 2016
Date Posted: June 9, 2016

Cookpad is Japan’s biggest recipe site - and one of the biggest Rails sites in the world - with 50M unique browsers per month. 80% of women in Japan between 20 and 40 use Cookpad!

This talk will cover lessons learned launching our service outside of Japan for the first time, to 30 new regions with 8 languages in 12 months, with a globally distributed team spread across 7 countries.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 210 times
Recorded at: May 20, 2016
Date Posted: June 9, 2016

Our company have handmaid shopping service named minne (https://minne.com). It’s made by Ruby and Rails. We use Ruby with manipulation of infrastructure widely. Minne has over the 200 servers on 2 data centers. we need to deploy latest application code in short minutes. So I made 'pull deploy strategy' using capistrano, consul, stretcher. I will introduce these topics:

* How to make 'immutable infrastructure' from 'mutable infrastructure'

* How to rapidly deploy Rails application to large-scaled service.

* How to use blue-green deployment with Rails

Finally, I can deploy same code to our servers in 3 minutes completely.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 161 times
Recorded at: May 20, 2016
Date Posted: June 9, 2016

00:12 - JavaScript by Rick Liu

04:06 - Helpers, Decorators, Exhibitors, Presenters by Lulalala

07:32 Why Developers Should Eat Healthier (and how) by Charlie Hua

12:59 Intro to RedPotion by Xdite

17:58 Unlock Dependency Between Client Teams and API Teams with API Mock and Proxy by Bruce Li

23:02 Continuous Updates: Update Early & Update Often by Juanito Fatas

27:39 High Five - Adam Cuppy

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 193 times
Recorded at: May 21, 2016
Date Posted: June 9, 2016

This lecture-performance will be a collaboration between Max and a presentation generator bot trained on thousands of presentations about Ruby on Rails downloaded from SlideShare. The talk will begin with a description of the bot and its programming. At the end the bot will have complete control and decide the direction of the presentation!

Topics covered include:

* Text generation bots
* Recurrent neural networks
* Ruby on Rails
* Whatever the bot decides is relevant

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 186 times
Recorded at: May 21, 2016
Date Posted: June 9, 2016

Before learining Rails, you heard that it speeds up the development considerably. However, once you become a professional developer, you found things aren't what you think it should be.

That's right. Your development speed has increased, but even with project management, you still have to work overtime. When you finally finish and release the product, the result does not meet your goal or expectation.

So after listening to this talk, you should gain some insights about delivering the project in time and successfully, and the next Hackathon winner will be you.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 201 times
Recorded at: May 21, 2016
Date Posted: June 9, 2016

If you have ever tried to learn how to code, you know how hard it is. If you succeeded at learning it, by now you should also be aware that it does not stop there.

This talk will cover my personal experience in learning new things, consolidating knowledge and giving some of it back to the community through teaching.

It provides many valuable lessons I have learned through years of making a concerted effort learn new subjects, from programming languages, to business practices you can apply at your own companies, to create a more welcoming environment for learners.

Key points:

* Learning how to learn

* Taking the time to learn

* Improving your personal productivity by being more organized

* How, where and at what point in your career can you help the community by teaching

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 362 times
Recorded at: May 21, 2016
Date Posted: June 9, 2016

Rails 5, has been a stellar release moving Rails ahead in current Web ecosystem. With new introductions, like ActionCable, Rails API, Rails is embracing the new directions web is moving towards and has emerged as a good backend for Single Page Apps.

This advances coupled with currently popular ReactJS, has hit a sweet spot, for those who want a more manageable way for their complex views. Rails 5 complement it perfectly

Lets take a look at how ActionCable, Rails API, React powered by Redux(flux), helped us build a realtime App, and how it can help you build a modular Single Page App.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 308 times
Recorded at: May 21, 2016
Date Posted: June 9, 2016

In this talk, I’ll share the recent trend about server infrastructure for your Rails application, and also our real world experiences:

1. Immutable infrastructure with Docker.

2. CI/CD flow for your containerized application.

3. Centralized logging & monitoring system.

4. Server performance tuning best practice.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 237 times
Recorded at: May 21, 2016
Date Posted: June 9, 2016

Testing Rails 5 apps has become better experience out of the box. Rails has also become smarter by introducing the test runner. Now we can't complain that about not able to run a single test or not getting coloured output. A lot of effort gone into making tests especially integration tests run faster.

The overall testing strategy is also moving from focussing testing internals to testing explicit parts of the whole system.

Come and join me as we will commence the journey to uncover the secrets of testing Rails 5 apps.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 561 times
Recorded at: May 21, 2016
Date Posted: June 9, 2016

Did you know that Shakespeare wrote almost no direction into his plays? No fight direction. No staging. No notes to the songs. Of the 1700 words he created, there was no official dictionary. That’s right the author of some of the greatest literary works in history, which were filled with situational complexity, fight sequences and music, include NO documentation! How did he do it?

In this talk, we’re going “thee and thou.” I’m going to give you a crash course in how: Shakespeare writes software.