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Madison+ videos were recorded and produced by Backflip Films of Madison, WI.

Madison+ UX 2014 Schedule

July 8 - 10, 2014

( 16 available presentations )
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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 406 times
Recorded at: July 11, 2014
Date Posted: August 12, 2014

Jessie will help set the tone for an exciting conference this year in Madison. She will be doing a creative and interactive kick-off to get all the attendees on the their feet, interacting with each other and having fun! While you are energized, she intends to have you get to know at least 3 or 4 new people that you will want to stay in touch with far beyond this year’s conference.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 322 times
Recorded at: July 11, 2014
Date Posted: August 13, 2014

What? Someone out there doesn’t want to just use the mouse?
If you’re sighted, it’s great, interfaces are perceived in at least 2d. If you’re blind, interfaces are most often perceived as 1d. Thoughts and ideas on how blind and sighted users alike see computer interfaces differently, and how to consider ways interfaces can be as efficient for blind users, as they are cool and innovative for their sighted counterparts.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 321 times
Recorded at: July 11, 2014
Date Posted: August 13, 2014

What does a great user experience have in common with a great story? Everything. While creating a user experience that engages, influences, and excites can sometimes seem daunting, crafting a great story is actually quite quick and easy. See how simple storytelling techniques can transform your next product, feature, UI, flow, or strategy from good to great. Whether you are creating a product, service, or feature from scratch or improving one for conversion, activation, or engagement, strategic storytelling will help you figure out what you need to do, when, and how you need to do it, so that you get the results you need.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 313 times
Recorded at: July 11, 2014
Date Posted: August 13, 2014

People use mobile devices for surprisingly complex tasks. Their constant presence trumps the extra time it may take to manipulate the small screen with clumsy fingers. So how do we deliver a simple mobile experience while delivering the breadth of functionality that users and stakeholders want to cram into these tiny containers?

In this session, Gail will show you how to apply essential design concepts like progressive disclosure, complexity masking, and linear pathways to create the perception of simplicity for your users. Broaden your strategies for getting all those features that your stakeholders ask for with a design simple enough for your dad to understand.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 248 times
Recorded at: July 11, 2014
Date Posted: August 13, 2014

As user experience professionals we address the unique needs of many diverse groups on a regular basis, but also depend on an assumption of a shared pool of knowledge and experience that transcends these distinctions. We assume that certain common iconography, terminology, and interactions are generally understood by most of the people we design for, but how do we handle the instances where these assumption prove false? How do we meet the needs of those on the wrong side of the “digital divide?” Do we seek to cater to the unique needs of those groups, even though doing so inevitably increases the divisions between them? Or do we attempt to expand and refine our assumptions to embrace a broader perspective, knowing that no matter how hard we try someone will be left out of the loop? By looking to parallels in other disciplines, namely architecture and urban planning, I will explore this dilemma and frame it in a way that allow us to develop a better understanding of it, and of it’s increasing significance in our daily work.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 328 times
Recorded at: July 11, 2014
Date Posted: August 13, 2014

Doing user experience design work at a digital agency is very different from doing it at a startup or small product company. I should know: I spent the first 15 years of my career in and running agencies and for the past year have been leading the UX effort at a small (50ish) but successful startup called Recurly in San Francisco. (You may have heard of us.)

In this talk, I’ll be sharing my experiences on both sides, the strengths and weaknesses of each, and sharing a few recommendations for the UX designer just starting out or thinking of making the leap from one to the other.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 357 times
Recorded at: July 11, 2014
Date Posted: August 13, 2014

Imposter Syndrome is the sense that you are less accomplished or qualified than your peers. It’s common in many professions where ambition is high, but it’s particularly prevalent in UX, where we have limited visibility into each other’s work. We end up thinking that everyone else knows something we don’t, that everyone is doing better work than we are.

The prevalence of Imposter Syndrome may also be due to the newness of the profession. University programs have only developed recently, and many, if not most, of us have come to the field of UX in a circuitous manner, so that it’s hard for us to feel like experts. Personality also seems to play a role, as Imposter Syndrome seems to be more prevalent among introverts – and introverts seem to be drawn to UX. Additionally, gender issues play a role in Imposter Syndrome and we’ll look at why it seems to be more prevalent among women. Regardless of the causes, however, Imposter Syndrome limits us as individuals and limits UX as a profession, and we all have an interest in overcoming it.

We will look at the research that has already been conducted on a larger non-industry specific scale and conduct some of our own research through a survey of our professional peers to further support our claims. We’ll also discuss the causes and consequences of Imposter Syndrome and how to deal with them. We’ll draw on our own experiences with Imposter Syndrome, and the talk will include quotes from well-known practitioners who have struggled with Imposter Syndrome themselves and how they’ve combatted it. We’ll look at how a bit of Imposter Syndrome can be a good thing. If we understand the basis for it and how it can help rather than hinder us, we can use it to grow as UX practitioners. We will provide tips to help overcome this specifically with the UX audience in mind.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 313 times
Recorded at: July 11, 2014
Date Posted: August 13, 2014

From opening a skateboard store at age 15, to launching the worlds first crowdsourced brewery this past year, standard procedure hasn’t really been in Henry’s vocabulary. In this talk Henry will walk through the development of the MobCraft model and how he changed the way the brewing industry operates by making a direct emotional connection between the end consumer and the manufacturer.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 329 times
Recorded at: July 11, 2014
Date Posted: August 13, 2014

What do circus arts and UX have in common? More than you might think! Prepare to be entertained by local artists from the Madison Circus Space, including a hoop dance by Heather and aerial performance by Jess and Jess Aerial Dance.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 328 times
Recorded at: July 12, 2014
Date Posted: August 13, 2014

It’s really hard to get people to love your product, your website, your app. It’s even harder to convert them to loyal customers. Reducing friction and upping persuasion only get you so far. A true shift in behavior often happens because of that one little thing that is unexpected, authentic, delightful. Based on a combination of online studies, observational user research, interviews, and social media sentiment analysis, it seems that changing user perspective is more about the small pleasures than the big groundbreakers. Come away with a short list of patterns, across sites and apps, for that one little thing that changes everything.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 320 times
Recorded at: July 12, 2014
Date Posted: August 13, 2014

A/B testing is a great technique to experiment with changes to your product. At Etsy we make extensive use of them to test out ideas; we’ve got 30+ running right now. Although the concept is simple, the execution is a bit tricker then you’d think. In this talk I will cover the common, and a few of the not so common, mistakes that can skew your results.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 253 times
Recorded at: July 12, 2014
Date Posted: August 13, 2014

How Non-Profits, Associations, and Service Based Organizations can leverage User, Brand, and Visual Experience to grow, energize, and engage their constituents.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 258 times
Recorded at: July 12, 2014
Date Posted: August 13, 2014

User Experience (UX) theory and practice can be confusing for the uninitiated. This talk outlines a set of UX Axioms designers and developers alike can use to integrate UX into their practice. Erik Dahl (@eadahl) shares hard-won lessons learned from practicing UX in the real world for over 10 years. Building real products and services involves an ongoing series of design compromises. There is no ideal process or magic bullet for integrating UX or creating amazing user experiences. However, understanding and applying UX Axioms will allow you to adapt to the situation at hand and build products that resonate with and delight your end-users.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 275 times
Recorded at: July 12, 2014
Date Posted: August 13, 2014

Face time with your users is precious, but a lot of funny (and not so funny) things can happen on the way to the session. We’ve seen it all: prototypes that don’t work, stakeholders who throw last-minute curveballs, participants who don’t show (or show up drunk!), etc., etc…. While the possibilities for failure can seem endless, disasters can be prevented if you know what to anticipate and how to plan for it.

In this talk, Centralis co-founder Kathi Kaiser will share lessons learned, drawing on war stories from fifteen years of field research and usability testing. She’ll offer tips, tricks and practical guidance for reducing risk and increasing the odds that you can make the most of your time with your users.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 576 times
Recorded at: July 12, 2014
Date Posted: August 13, 2014

Although we have all heard someone passionately declare, “UX is not UI,” visual design is a fundamental part of the user experience. Good design is in the details. It builds trust. It creates hierarchy of information. It makes buttons look clickable. It has the power to transform a functional experience into a delightful experience.

So how we can ensure that the visual details we design are brought to life as intended? Can moving an object 1 pixel to the left really make a difference? In an attempt to find a common language between designers and developers, we will discuss what details are worth fighting for versus when to let go.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 269 times
Recorded at: July 12, 2014
Date Posted: August 13, 2014

Making a mistake makes us feel dumb. We can learn from our mistakes but, unless we share what we’ve learned with our team, it’s only a matter of time until someone else makes the same mistake. Maybe our work environment doesn’t provide an outlet for sharing these lessons. Maybe it should.
Dr. Leslie Jensen-Inman will show you how to: take the iterative process you use daily for client projects and apply it to your own learning; share your discoveries with your co-workers and learn from their experience; and teach junior designers by showing them how you recover when you fail and encourage a culture of lifelong learning.