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JSFest Oakland 2014 Schedule

March 6 - 12, 2014

( 21 available presentations )
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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 9 times
Recorded at: March 6, 2014
Date Posted: February 29, 2016

Closing keynote of DHTMLConf 2000, the world's premiere enterprise trade show.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 75 times
Recorded at: March 6, 2014
Date Posted: February 29, 2016

Mathia Buus' impromptu presentation on booking Docker images in realtime over bittorrent.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 17 times
Recorded at: March 6, 2014
Date Posted: February 29, 2016

We (developers) are in the front line when it comes to software security. Security has many facets but from a practical perspective it is about learning from the past, keeping up with the present, predicting and changing the future, and automating the boring and repetitive parts.

This talk will explore
- Core security principles we all should be aware of.
- Security in the node ecosystem & node core.
- Musings on how to apply the above to open source and enterprise security.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 10 times
Recorded at: March 7, 2014
Date Posted: February 29, 2016

Mark Nadal kicking off Nothing Is Sacred with "Turing Synesthesia"

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 8 times
Recorded at: March 7, 2014
Date Posted: February 29, 2016

Jack Parmer takes on "JavaScript in Science"

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 15 times
Recorded at: March 7, 2014
Date Posted: February 29, 2016

Jenn Schiffer of the Internet giving the opening Keynote of DHTMLConf 2000

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 20 times
Recorded at: March 8, 2014
Date Posted: February 29, 2016

Recently I did a talk on `process.nextTick()` & `setImmediate()` for flow control. I think it could use a bit of polish to meet these two points mentioned:

- Don't talk about a technology, tell the story of what you did with that technology.
- SFest is designed to be accessible. Talks should be targetted at new to intermediate skill levels.

Talk slides & example code starting point: https://github.com/sprjr/baynode-flow...

I had a few 'aha' comments after and think it might be something I could improve quite a bit for JSFest Oakland.

Let me know what you think, thanks!

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 8 times
Recorded at: March 8, 2014
Date Posted: February 29, 2016

In a world where CSS support is spotty at best (wtf is CSS anyway?), the only reliable way to achieve pixel perfect web design is to use pixels. Just one pixel. We'll cover a broad range of topics such as:

- What do I call my 1 pixel GIF?
- Indenting paragraphs perfectly every time
- Tables and spacer GIFs : a match made in heaven
- What is the smallest GIF I can make?
- Transparency OR My background is your foreground!
- Moving beyond a single pixel : a color adaptive rounded corner solution for the modern web
- Invisible helper pixels an invisibility : what do you call something you can't see?
- XBM : The image you can generate with ASCII!
- Welcome to the future : using CGI to generate spacer GIFs on the fly
- BONUS : universal foreign language support using pixel fonts!

For years I hosted 1x1gif.net - a CDN for single pixel supremacy. I'm ready to share with everything I've learned about designing with one of the web's most powerful hidden gems.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 6 times
Recorded at: March 8, 2014
Date Posted: February 29, 2016

The closing keynote of Nothing Is Sacred at JSFest Oakland: "Your Job is Political" by Kelsey Gilmore-Innis

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 14 times
Recorded at: March 9, 2014
Date Posted: February 29, 2016

Max Ogden's impromptu presentation on Dat.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 15 times
Recorded at: March 9, 2014
Date Posted: February 29, 2016

When it comes to getting users to your website, nothing is more important than the elusive techniques of Search Engine Optimization. Without a prominent search enginer ranking, your website will be doomed to a clickless, loveless oblivion. Unfortunately, Search Engine Optimization is wildly misunderstood and thus poorly employed method for improving your traffic. Angelina Fabbro has (unfortunately) been a part of the world of SEO since the dawn of the internet, and even before search engines (don't ask how - she'll tell you how!) ever existed.

In this talk, Angelina will teach about key strategies to synergize your content with your affiliate link program requirements, such as:

- optimal keyword density per page
- tweaking your meta tags for better indexing
- writing effective alt-tags for your images
- white hat vs. black hat SEO
- doorway pages
- article spinning
- in-bound link strategy
- why you should pay Angelina to do all of this for you
- and more!

Be mystified no further - no matter what color hat you like to wear (please don't let it be a fedora) Angelina will have practical solutions for you to grow your website empire.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 17 times
Recorded at: March 9, 2014
Date Posted: February 29, 2016

"Thinking Inside the Box — Constraints are not Compromises" -- Amanda Glosson talks about how to use constraints to your advantage.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 11 times
Recorded at: March 10, 2014
Date Posted: February 29, 2016

Here you are, at a community event, talking about node. Why are you here? Because you're part of a community. We have a cultural stereotype of a programmer as a solitary hacker hammering on a keyboard late at night, but programmers don't really do their work alone. We work in teams and we gather in places like this to learn from each other.

I used to think we were solitary hackers, and I used to think it was my responsibility to learn everything on my own. The node.js community was the community that finally convinced me otherwise. How did node lure me out of my corner? What's different about it? What did I gain when I joined the wider community? What did I risk? What did I learn how to give in return? What can *you* gain from more participation in your community? And what will we all gain from you, yes *you* if you join me in risk-taking?

This talk is intended for NodeConf One-Shot.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 19 times
Recorded at: March 10, 2014
Date Posted: February 29, 2016

From the W3C spec (http://www.w3.org/MarkUp/VRML/):

"""VRML allows to create "virtual worlds" networked via the Internet and hyperlinked with the World Wide Web."""

The year is 1995. The place... *cyberspace*.

The exciting new technology Virtual Reality Modeling Language, or VRML for short, is poised to change the way we surf the information superhighway forever. Rather than scrolling through a boring old document, web surfers would now have the ability to literally navigate the information superhighway to virtual worlds of their own creation.

These worlds mostly consist of spinning cubes.

This talk will also touch on the virtual reality file system navigator as seen in Jurassic Park.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 23 times
Recorded at: March 10, 2014
Date Posted: February 29, 2016

To fully master Node.js, you need to understand its personality.

A framework's personality and guiding principles influence everything around it. While it's possible to write JavaScript in a hundred different ways, the Node.js philosophy affects everything from the different arguments a callback can take to the actual architecture of Node.js applications. Some of these patterns are easy to spot, but most are quite subtle. In all, it takes months or even years to fully grasp them all on your own.

"The Node.js Way" is a collection of everything I've learned over the last few years, from working with Node.js on open-source projects, in the enterprise, and while writing The Node.js Handbook (https://github.com/FredKSchott/NodeJS...). It includes design patterns, best practices, and tribal knowledge, all distilled and compiled into four main sections: **Structure** (ex: "Build modules to serve a single purpose"), **Community** (ex: "Choose composition over inheritance", "Write modules for others to read"), **Async** (ex: "Leverage flow control", "return early"), and **Stability** (ex: "Handle errors close to the source").

The goal of this talk is to shorten that learning curve from years down to just 20 minutes. While this talk will be most valuable to the intermediate and advanced, it will all be understandable and exciting to beginners as well.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 23 times
Recorded at: March 10, 2014
Date Posted: February 29, 2016

Now'a'days we can run javascript basically everywhere!

Hackers love Node because its fast and lightweight. You can use it for practically anything reasonable - but how can the average hacker burning the midnight oil quickly create their own minimum viable product utilizing the skills they already know?

This talk will take you through my experience of being a naïve developer creating SmartDoor (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yfmga...) with nothing but a Raspberry Pi, a doorbell (yes, a doorbell) and couple StackOverflow answers. The cool thing is that javascript is literally used in all parts of the project. Nothing is device or platform specific and really applies to a large amount of scenarios.

I'll go through lessons learned such best practices in testing by simulating devices with node processes in the cloud and how cool it is that you can scale to a large amount of devices and data by making the right design decisions - which sometimes is just letting someone else do it for you!

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 19 times
Recorded at: March 11, 2014
Date Posted: February 29, 2016

How far can we take JavaScript itself? @briantford and I have both spent a lot of time pushing the limits of metaprogramming in JavaScript and have learned an inordinate amount about what can and can't be done with raw JavaScript as a result. How far can you get and how fast, even without transpilers, AST parsers, or macro systems? And how much further can we go when we add those into the mix?

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 5 times
Recorded at: March 11, 2014
Date Posted: February 29, 2016

It’s 2000. I’m 15. I run a semi-popular personal website made with greymatter that gets a few thousand hits a week (which isn’t bad for me complaining about school and my mom), a live journal community with over 6000 members, and contribute & code a music website for other teens that lets me get into tons of shows for free and interview bands.

Let me tell you about what I use to build things, and my favorite places online.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 13 times
Recorded at: March 11, 2014
Date Posted: February 29, 2016

When I became a developer evangelist in early 2012, I was told that an important part of my job was to support my local developer community. I threw myself into the role, eventually getting involved in organizing meetups, hackathons, conferences and even a coworking space in Seattle, WA.

One of the great ironies of the open source community is that very little information about how to bring people together and organize events is public knowledge. Everything I learned came from private conversations with other organizers or the school of hard knocks.

I think that this is shame because our community is growing and we need more people to get involved as organizers, mentors and teachers. And in order to do this we, as organizers, need to open source what we know and lower the barriers to entry for anyone down the line who wants to help.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 11 times
Recorded at: March 11, 2014
Date Posted: February 29, 2016

Nathan Zadoks walks us through microkernels with "Rethinking the bedrock of computing"

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 45 times
Recorded at: March 12, 2014
Date Posted: February 29, 2016

At JSConf 2014, I debuted a NodeBots Dress. It had some issues, but overall it worked well and I had a TON of fun building it.

When I got home, I thought "What do I need to make a full NodeBots...outfit?"

And the work truly began.

This talk will walk through the ideas, construction, and javascript-ification of my NodeBots outfit: from the beginnings and dress v0.1 to my current iteration of a full outfit. Hopefully you'll learn about wearable technology, NodeBots platforms, and how you, too, can have a NodeBots wardrobe.