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FutureJS 2014 Schedule

May 1 - 3, 2014

( 16 available presentations )
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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 8 times
Recorded at: May 1, 2014
Date Posted: February 4, 2016

This is a talk from Barcelona FutureJS 2014 (http://futurejs.org).

Surprisingly the high performance mutation available in modern JavaScript engines is a great foundation for building high performance immutable collections. Even more surprisingly efficient immutable collections permit new ways of approaching user interface programming. While the details will be in Om, an immutable user interface toolkit written in ClojureScript over Facebook's React, the talk will be primarily focused on high level concepts easily ported to JavaScript. We'll dive in and see how trees of JavaScript arrays can permit building these efficient immutable collections. Then we'll see how embracing immutable values dramatically simplifies some classic hard problems in client side programming including but not limited to undo, error playback, and online/offline synchronization.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 36 times
Recorded at: May 1, 2014
Date Posted: February 4, 2016

This is a talk from Barcelona FutureJS 2014 (http://futurejs.org).

In the past few years, the JavaScript language has evolved considerably -- and there's even more great stuff coming in ES6. The question is, when can you use these new features without locking out a big chunk of your users? In this talk, I'll show you how you can use compiler like Traceur to take advantage of the latest and greatest JS features while retaining compatibility with older browsers. We'll also dig into how these so-called "transpilers" work, and show that it's not that hard to start experimenting with your own language features. Learn how to build your own dialect of JavaScript, or even a whole new language like CoffeeScript!

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 30 times
Recorded at: May 1, 2014
Date Posted: February 4, 2016

This is a talk from Barcelona FutureJS 2014 (http://futurejs.org).

Compared to many modern languages, JavaScript is somewhat minimal. It has first-class functions, but a supply of functional tools. It has objects, but its inheritance model is sparse and its metaobjects are hacked on top of functions. This is frustrating to some and a blessing to others. It does not force a heavyweight paradigm upon you, and if you need more you can build it yourself. And everybody does. But all too-often, we look backwards and re-create past, when we could be looking forward and inventing future.

Instead of copying ideas from 1984, we should invent ideas that others will copy in 2044.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 18 times
Recorded at: May 1, 2014
Date Posted: February 4, 2016

This is a talk from Barcelona FutureJS 2014 (http://futurejs.org).

JavaScript is an incredibly versatile language and one of my favorites for rapidly building fun casual games. In 2013 I made 12 games for the One Game A Month game jam and came in 3rd place out of hundreds of developers. It was an eye opening experience and in this talk I'll go through the five key things you need to know to speed up your development, make better games and build truly cross platform HTML5 games.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 42 times
Recorded at: May 1, 2014
Date Posted: February 4, 2016

These are the 5" lightning talk sessions from Barcelona FutureJS 2014.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 44 times
Recorded at: May 1, 2014
Date Posted: February 4, 2016

This is a talk from Barcelona FutureJS 2014 (http://futurejs.org).

After a decade of stagnation, JavaScript is finally evolving once again. Instead of writing to the lowest common denominator (cough IE6), you can start using new features and conveniences. We'll run through some of the new ideas in ES6 and beyond, and talk about CoffeeScript features that you can use today.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 66 times
Recorded at: May 2, 2014
Date Posted: February 4, 2016

This is a talk from Barcelona FutureJS 2014 (http://futurejs.org).

Introduction to playing and modifying sounds in the browser with JavaScript. Overview of the Web Audio API and its possibilities (and limitations).
Category
Science & Technology

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 48 times
Recorded at: May 2, 2014
Date Posted: February 4, 2016

This is a talk from Barcelona FutureJS 2014 (http://futurejs.org).

In this talk I'll be discussing why we built a virtual DOM, how it compares to other systems, and its relevance to the future of browser technologies.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 48 times
Recorded at: May 2, 2014
Date Posted: February 4, 2016

This is a talk from Barcelona FutureJS 2014 (http://futurejs.org).

We usually interact with the web through a single browser, even when we've got several web-enabled devices nearby (with even more in the future). I'll talk about sharing an interaction across multiple devices to push past the constraints of a single browser app.

I'll cover the concepts required to produce this kind of interface, and discuss the web technologies that are key to making this interaction a reality.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 48 times
Recorded at: May 2, 2014
Date Posted: February 4, 2016

This is a talk from Barcelona FutureJS 2014 (http://futurejs.org).

In this talk I will explore the future of WebRTC powered apps beyond real-time audio and video. How the P2P nature of WebRTC will enable you to develop the next generation of decentralized web apps that are secure and respectful towards the privacy of your users.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 8 times
Recorded at: May 2, 2014
Date Posted: February 4, 2016

This is a talk from Barcelona FutureJS 2014 (http://futurejs.org).

Developing large apps is difficult. Ensuring that code is consistent, well structured, tested, maintainable and has an architecture that encourages enhancement is essential. When it comes to large server-focused apps, solutions to this problem have been tried and tested. But, with the ongoing dramatic shift of functionality into the browser, how do you achieve this when building Front-End Web Apps?

In this talk we'll cover the signs to watch out for as your HTML5 SPA grows and provide examples of some of the tooling types that can contribute-to - as well as ease - the growing pains. Finally, we'll demonstrate how tooling can be used to support a set of conventions, practices and principles that enable a productive developer workflow where the first line of code is feature code, features can be developed in isolation, code conflicts are avoided by grouping assets by feature and features are composed into apps.

The demonstrations will use the BladeRunnerJS open source developer toolkit, but the concepts are widely applicable.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 2 times
Recorded at: May 3, 2014
Date Posted: February 4, 2016

This is a talk from Barcelona FutureJS 2014 (http://futurejs.org).

What's does a mouse drag event have in common with an Array of numbers?

The answer to this question may surprise you: they are both collections. This key insight holds the key to dramatically simplifying asynchronous programming in JavaScript. In this talk you will learn how you can use the familiar JavaScript Array methods to create surprisingly expressive asynchronous programs. Using just a few functions, you will learn how to do the following:

Declaratively build complex events out of simple events (ex. drag n' drop)
Coordinate and sequence multiple Ajax requests
Reactively update UI's in response to data changes
Eliminate memory leaks caused by neglecting to unsubscribe from events
Gracefully propagate and handle asynchronous exceptions
In this talk we'll be exploring the Reactive Extensions (RxJS) library which allows us to treat events as collections. We'll also contrast Rx with Promises, another popular approach to building asynchronous programs in JavaScript, and see how it plays with the future of JavaScript with generators on the horizon as well as async/await. We'll also look into streaming APIs and how we can handle backpressure and be a good source for streaming APIs in JavaScript.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 6 times
Recorded at: May 3, 2014
Date Posted: February 4, 2016

This is a talk from Barcelona FutureJS 2014 (http://futurejs.org).

Turning set of numbers into a simple graph can instantly tell us a story about data, but there are times when a standard graph isn't enough. Sometimes we need to search for untradtional and creative ways to visualize our data to express our story. In this talk, we'll explore less common and unique ways of visualizing data sets on the web using D3.js, a flexible way to manipulate DOM elements using data. We'll discuss the reasoning behind the graphics we create, and talk about the benefits and pitfalls of working with D3.js from design and technical viewpoints.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 29 times
Recorded at: May 3, 2014
Date Posted: February 4, 2016

This is a talk from Barcelona FutureJS 2014 (http://futurejs.org).

Sometimes, the answer to an engineering problem is not a new library, or a new platform feature, but a new language. We often gripe about the warts and limitations of HTML, CSS and JavaScript and there are dozens if not hundreds of new languages vying to replace them. But if the future of JavaScript is, well, not JavaScript, how can everyday users shape this future?

JavaScript, so the legend goes, was built in 10 days. I'd like go one better and show you how easy it is to get started with language hacking, by building a working Lisp engine from scratch in just 20 minutes. It'll have arithmetic, conditional logic, variables, user-defined functions, recursion and lexical closures: a minimal useful feature set that you can use to understand how languages work and explore your own ideas.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 40 times
Recorded at: May 3, 2014
Date Posted: February 4, 2016

This is a talk from Barcelona FutureJS 2014 (http://futurejs.org).

Imagine if the world could fit in your browser. If, when booking a holiday, you could see what the pilot flying you there would see, or a bird's eye view of the mountain, before you hit the pistes.

In this talk, I'll introduce a project of mine called terra.js, which aims to make all these things possible and discuss ideas for the future.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 6 times
Recorded at: May 3, 2014
Date Posted: February 4, 2016

This is a talk from Barcelona FutureJS 2014 (http://futurejs.org).

Web components are an interesting set of standard proposals, promising to make web development more modular and speed up development.

So - what exactly are web components, how do they work and when can I finally get them into production? This and more will be covered in this talk.