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Fullstackfest 2016 original

Video Recording and production done by Codegram Technologies

Full Stack Fest 2016 Schedule

September 5 - December 9, 2016

( 33 available presentations )
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Recorded at: September 5, 2016
Date Posted: December 5, 2016

How do you take the biggest commerce platform in the world, with hundreds of thousands of shops and make it run out of multiple locations? We'll go through how Shopify went from one datacenter, to a passive disaster recovery site all the way to to running shops out of multiple datacenters concurrently. The talk will cover how we move shops between data centers and perform failovers with the click of a button. We'll share the patterns that are widely useful, such as using load balancers to sort requests around the world to the right data centers.

About Simon:

When Simon's not researching walruses or playing chaos monkey for the company's infrastructure, he's hard at work taming the wildlife of production, protecting Shopify from flash sales, scale, misbehaving resources and itself. Other than that, as a new resident of Canada, fulfilling his obligation to call everyone out when they think they've experienced "cold weather"

Talk given at Full Stack Fest 2016 (https://www.fullstackfest.com)

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Recorded at: September 5, 2016
Date Posted: December 5, 2016

Modern systems can fail in spectacular ways. Failure isn’t a question of if, but when. Resilient systems can endure and gracefully recover from failures, but ensuring your system has these properties requires thought and some deliberate architectural decisions. Join me in this talk as I attempt to find answers in literature and industry to build a more robust system. I will also share the lessons learned while applying these patterns and key takeaways that you can carry to your own systems.

About the speaker:

Ines Sombra is an Engineer at @Fastly, where she spends her time helping the Web go faster. Ines holds an M.S. in Computology with an emphasis on Cheesy 80's Rock Ballads. She has a fondness for steak, fernet, and a pug named Gordo. In a previous life she was a Data Engineer.

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Recorded at: September 5, 2016
Date Posted: December 5, 2016

The first program on a stored-program computer ran on on June 21st, 1948. Since then a lot has happened... This talk will look at the development of hardware and software from the birth of the first stored program computer in 1948 until today. That covers the first 68 years. Then I'll make a few guesses as to what will happen in the next 32 years. Progress in Hardware has been enormous, todays computers are billions of times more powerful than the first computers. But has software improved? Can we write programs billion of times faster than 60 years ago? I'll talk about some of the fundamental reasons why programming is intrinsically hard, and then I'll look at a few of the problems that the computer industry has accidentally created, and suggest a few problems that you might like to solve.

Talk given at Full Stack Fest 2016 (https://www.fullstackfest.com)

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Recorded at: September 5, 2016
Date Posted: December 5, 2016

Unikernels, built with library operating systems, reinvent earlier ideas for the modern era, improving the specialisation of apps. In fact, there is a continuum of specialisation, with general purpose OSs at one end, unikernels at the other extreme, & containerised apps in between. All these options give developers more freedom & choice over how they write & distribute their apps. However, it also presents challenges in terms of understanding which approach is appropriate for a given use-case. As with all technology, there are trade-offs with unikernels. This talk considers the benefits & drawbacks. By stepping away from hype & clarifying misunderstandings, attendees will appreciate why unikernels exist & where they're going. Attendees will also have a better idea of when they should consider a library OS for their next project, as well as the trade-offs they'll need to consider.

About the speaker:

Amir Chaudhry works at Docker to make unikernels accessible to developers everywhere, and is the Community Manager for MirageOS. Most of his time is spent on open source efforts and he’s a big fan of automation to maximise developer impact. In previous lives he was Programme Manager at OCaml Labs, led operations at a medical device start-up, created a seed investing programme, and was a board observer at another startup. Amir also has a diverse academic background with an MSci in Physics and a PhD in Neuroscience. When not working on unikernels, Amir is probably looking at the sky and wondering when he can next go skydiving.

Talk given at Full Stack Fest 2016 (https://www.fullstackfest.com)

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Recorded at: September 5, 2016
Date Posted: December 5, 2016

Slides: https://pragtob.wordpress.com/2016/09...

This year AlphaGo shocked the world by decisively beating the strongest human Go player, Lee Sedol. An accomplishment that wasn't expected for years to come. How did AlphaGo do this? What algorithms did it use? What advances in AI made it possible? This talk will answer these questions.

About the speaker:

Tobi is a clean coder, Rubyist, learner, teacher and agile craftsman by passion. He organizes the Ruby User Group Berlin, maintains shoes and contributes to a variety of projects while thinking about new ideas to put into code and push boundaries. He loves collaboratively creating just about anything people enjoy. Currently he's flying in the bitcrowd airship creating wonderful web applications.

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Recorded at: September 6, 2016
Date Posted: December 5, 2016

HTTP2 is already here, but apparently we are not using it. Learn why it's awesome. How we can boost website performance up to 50%. The missing pieces of the puzzle? The glue between the apps and frameworks to the webserver, for features like server push and getting the asset pipeline out of our way!

About the speaker:

Ole Michaelis is the co-founder of SoCoded, a hackfest and web development conference in Hamburg. He's a Software Engineer at Jimdo, a DIY website creator, where he focuses on backend development. In his free time, he's building slidr.io, a hazzle-free slide sharing platform. Ole is passionate about open source software, enjoys traveling, and loves Mexican food. He classifies himself as a ‘bad' German as he dislikes beer and soccer – the traditional German past-times.

Talk given at Full Stack Fest 2016 (https://www.fullstackfest.com)

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Recorded at: September 6, 2016
Date Posted: December 5, 2016

Unison is a new programming language and platform. This talk zooms in on just one aspect of Unison: its support for building large-scale, distributed systems. As a running example, Paul will work up to the code for a simple search engine, written with minimal code, and discuss how it's all done.

About the speaker:

Founder and Principal Consultant at Stage N Consulting, specializing in Scala, Haskell, Elm, and functional programming. Previously a technical lead at S&P Capital IQ, where he grew and led a team of Scala and Haskell developers successfully applying functional programming to a variety of problems. Open source contributor to the library 'FS2: Functional Streams for Scala', a library for the Scala language. Also co-author of the book Functional Programming in Scala.

Talk given at Full Stack Fest 2016 (https://www.fullstackfest.com)

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Recorded at: September 6, 2016
Date Posted: December 5, 2016

Lightning talks given at Full Stack Fest 2016 (https://www.fullstackfest.com)

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Recorded at: September 6, 2016
Date Posted: December 5, 2016

During this talk, Ben will share his experiences and investigate Docker and it's security model. The aim is to answer the question - “How secure are Docker containers?”

About the speaker:

Ben is the founder of Ocelot Uproar, a company focused on training and building products loved by users. Ben enjoys looking for the next challenges to solve, usually over an occasional beer. Ocelot Uproar recently launched Katacoda (Katacoda.com), an interactive learning environment for software engineers.

Talk given at Full Stack Fest 2016 (https://www.fullstackfest.com)

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Recorded at: September 6, 2016
Date Posted: December 5, 2016

This talk aims to present the most important ideas behind high availability support in Elixir/Erlang. It is a medium to high-level explanation of tools and approaches that can help developers drastically increase the uptime of their systems.

About the speaker:

Software developer at Aircloak, a startup developing a solution for plug-and-play privacy compliance. Has many years of experience building server systems as well as desktop applications using various languages and technologies such as Elixir, Erlang, Ruby, JavaScript, C#, C++. The author of “Elixir in Action”, and an occasional blogger at theerlangelist.com.

Talk given at Full Stack Fest 2016 (https://www.fullstackfest.com)

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Recorded at: September 6, 2016
Date Posted: December 5, 2016

The "serverless architecture" has become massively popular this year, and for the right reasons. It’s zero-administration nature and pay-per-execution pricing model have removed the major limitations preventing developers from provisioning infinite amounts of logic. Here we chat about the state of the serverless architecture, the vastly intricate, event-driven architectures it will enable in the future, and how empowering it will be for companies and individual developers alike.

About the speaker:

An early adopter of AWS Lambda, Austen created the Serverless Framework (formerly known as JAWS) to help everyone develop and deploy entire applications onto Lambda and API Gateway. Since then, he's founded Serverless, Inc., which was recently funded by the investors behind Docker, New Relic and Meteor. Serverless, Inc., employs some of the most talented engineers in the serverless space and is building tooling to help everyone build and maintain serverless architectures. Austen is a full-stack javascript developer, an infrastructure engineer, a designer and an AWS community hero.

Talk given at Full Stack Fest 2016 (https://www.fullstackfest.com)

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Recorded at: September 6, 2016
Date Posted: December 5, 2016

Microservices are an exciting idea, but it’s hard to see how to put them into practice until you’ve seen them in the real world. In this talk we’ll see a real-world microservice architecture, looking at the content pipeline behind BBC Newsbeat.

About the speaker:

Tim Perry is a tech lead and the open-source champion at Softwire, a bespoke software development company in London, Bristol and Bucharest. He's also the creator of Build Focus, a contributor to a huge range of open-source tools across the JS, Java and C# ecosystems, and the maintainer of Loglevel and Server Components.

Talk given at Full Stack Fest 2016 (https://www.fullstackfest.com)

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Recorded at: September 7, 2016
Date Posted: December 5, 2016

In this talk, we'll explore Elm, the programming language that brings an entirely new approach to front-end development. We'll study the language but, more importantly, the characteristics that make it such a great language to build reliable, robust client-side applications and how we can take these properties and apply them to JavaScript applications.

About the speaker:

Jack is a JavaScript Developer at Songkick, based in London. He spends most of his time writing and talking about JavaScript and front end web development. He's the author of "Beginning jQuery" (Apress, 2013) and is currently focusing on ECMAScript 6, React and the state of tooling for web developers. If not at a computer he's usually found playing football or sat in the pub talking about code.

Talk given at Full Stack Fest 2016 (https://www.fullstackfest.com)

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Recorded at: September 7, 2016
Date Posted: December 5, 2016

In this talk Brian will walk you through the ideas, techniques and technologies used to build a SaaS Recommendation Engine. From building an efficient software classifier, to storing the large amounts of data required, to the pipeline of artificial intelligence and machine learning algorithms used. The system is being built with a myriad of technologies including Java, Cassandra, Ruby, Rails, Clojure, Javascript and more.

About the speaker:

Brian Sam-Bodden is an author, instructor, speaker and hacker that has spent most of his life (adult and otherwise) crafting software. He is well versed in several programming languages and has a deep passion for Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence in general. His perfect Sunday includes walks on a virtual beach with his pals of HAL, DeepThought, the Architect and MCP. Brian lives in the post apocalyptic, waste-land, Mad-Max’esque state of Arizona, U.S.A. where he leads Integrallis; a Polyglot Consultancy and is also the founder of Binnacle (http://binnacle.io) a multi-purpose dashboard for web applications.

Talk given at Full Stack Fest 2016 (https://www.fullstackfest.com)

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Viewed 9 times
Recorded at: September 7, 2016
Date Posted: December 5, 2016

About the speaker:

Jafar Husain is Netflix's Cross-Team Technical Lead and has 16 years of experience in the industry. He's currently a member of the TC39, the Javascript standards body designing the next version of JS. He specializes in building web servers and clients using functional reactive programming, and was the first user of the Reactive Extensions Framework. He's also the architect of Falkor, a RESTful data access framework that powers most Netflix clients. A highly-rated speaker, he has spoken about reactive programming at HTML5DevConf, YOW!, QCon, CodeMesh, and given Channel 9 interviews on the subject. He has also authored interactive training software to help developers learn about functional reactive programming.

Talk given at Full Stack Fest 2016 (https://www.fullstackfest.com)

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Recorded at: September 7, 2016
Date Posted: December 5, 2016

The InterPlanetary File System (IPFS) is a new hypermedia distribution protocol, addressed by content and identities. IPFS enables the creation of completely distributed applications. It aims to make the web faster, safer, and more open. IPFS enables completely decentralized and distributed apps. And it now supports fully dynamic apps, like real-time chat! This talk breaks down how to build a dynamic app on top of IPFS with CRDTs, pub/sub, and slick UIs. It also delves into new models for distributed computation, and the ethical importance of distributing the web.

About the speaker:

Juan is the inventor of IPFS and Filecoin. He founded Protocol Labs, Inc., he loves open source, and believes improving the internet is critical work. Juan is obsessed with knowledge, science, and technology. He studied at Stanford, and the Web.

Talk given at Full Stack Fest 2016

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Recorded at: September 7, 2016
Date Posted: December 5, 2016

One of the greatest challenges of building a rich UI is keeping track of all that is changing: incoming touch and mouse events, new data from your servers, animations, and more. Here we propose a new way to tackle this challenge that is as old as computing itself: don't let anything change in the first place. Come learn about how to build rich and highly performant UIs without losing your sanity by leveraging immutable data and the optimization techniques it enables.

About the speaker:

Lee has been making things at Facebook since 2008: React, GraphQL, Immutable.js, Mobile, JavaScript, Nonsense.

Talk given at Full Stack Fest 2016 (https://www.fullstackfest.com)

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Recorded at: September 7, 2016
Date Posted: December 5, 2016

As our applications grow larger, our REST architecture often becomes unmanageable. Custom endpoints and over/under fetching all become part of your life as a developer. Leave that behind and welcome GraphQL, a declarative and hierarchal way to fetch data, with just one endpoint to rule them all.

About the speaker:

A Jazz guitarist turned developer, Marc-André is currently working at Shopify, trying to make commerce better for everyone. When he's not hacking on Rails, GraphQL or Relay, he likes lifting heavy barbells above his head.

Talk given at Full Stack Fest 2016 (https://www.fullstackfest.com)

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Recorded at: September 7, 2016
Date Posted: December 5, 2016

NLP can be a scary piece of jargon. In reality, you can get a far distance with loops, functions, and if statements, and still manage to create a delightful chat interface. This talk will cover low-res ways to incorporate NLP so you can get more bang for your buck without needing full AI.

About the speaker:

Duretti Hirpa is a senior engineer on the backend engineering team at Slack. Currently, she's working on the growth team, though she's also spent time on the Slack Platform team - making it easier and more intuitive to build applications on top of Slack. She's constantly thinking of ways to humanize engineering - there's strength in the soft skills, after all. She's arguably probably the most extroverted person she knows, and is intensely interested in other people. She produces a podcast called “snackoverflow”, about snacks, computers, and their surprising intersection. She has an undying love for Beyoncé (praise be), an immaculate gif game, and a real candy problem.

Talk given at Full Stack Fest 2016 (https://www.fullstackfest.com)

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Recorded at: September 8, 2016
Date Posted: December 5, 2016

Come see a demonstration on how to interact with an open-source brain-computer interface via JavaScript. Alex has been working with the OpenBCI team in order to visualize and interpret brainwaves in the browser with Angular. Find out how your thoughts are captured and how to get involved in the NeuroTech community.

About the speaker:

Alex Castillo is a Software Engineer at Netflix and specializes in enterprise single-page applications. Alex is very passionate about the human brain and how we can use technology to understand it better. He has contributed to the open source community and focuses on Angular and NeuroTech. On his spare time, he likes experimenting with guitars and IoT.

Talk given at Full Stack Fest 2016 (https://www.fullstackfest.com)

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 5 times
Recorded at: September 8, 2016
Date Posted: December 5, 2016

Lightning talks given at Full Stack Fest 2016 (https://www.fullstackfest.com)

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Recorded at: September 8, 2016
Date Posted: December 5, 2016

What if instead of building your own mental model of how data flows through your application, you could actually see the data flowing in real-time? In this talk we will explore functional and reactive streams as a building block in JavaScript applications, with tools like RxJS, Cycle.js, xstream, which enable DevTools from the future.

About the speaker:

User interface developer and designer, with extensive knowledge in reactive programming. Obsessed with the future - wants to make it become reality today.

Software deals with complex control flow mechanisms like callbacks, promises, events, and streams. Chosen solution has a deep impact on your code. Things can be simplified to a single abstraction since the underlying problem to all of this is the same, with CSP and the concept of channels.

About the speaker:

Vincenzo Chianese is an Italian software developer currently working for Apiary.io. He puts bugs in the code, making sure that his coworkers have always something to fix.

Talk given at Full Stack Fest 2016 (https://www.fullstackfest.com)

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Recorded at: September 8, 2016
Date Posted: December 5, 2016

For years, front-end developers fumbled with hacking floats for layouts, often as part of a grid system. Media queries made these float-based grids more responsive to different screen dimensions, but unfortunately, the behaviors weren't always granular enough to work well with complex layouts. Now with the new Grid specification in CSS4, we can easily define behaviors for each cell in our layouts in two dimensions. When combined with media queries, we can specify where each cell will be placed under a variety of conditions, in horizontal and vertical space. Similarities and differences with Flexbox will also be identified and discussed.

About the speaker:

Jen Kramer has been teaching and performing web design for over 16 years. Most recently, she is a Lecturer at Harvard University Extension School in the Master's of Liberal Arts in Digital Media Design program, where she teaches five courses per year on front-end web development, advises capstone projects, and assists in curriculum design. She's also a prolific video author, creating 27 training courses for lynda.com, O'Reilly Media, and Aquent Gymnasium. Jen also freelances on web design projects occasionally. She earned her MS in Internet Strategy Management from Marlboro College Graduate School.

Talk given at Full Stack Fest 2016 (https://www.fullstackfest.com)

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Recorded at: September 8, 2016
Date Posted: December 5, 2016

Web pages are dead, very dead: long live apps! The web is the land of the paradigm shift and Frontend Developers are mutant ninjas. Today's frontends embody the UI, the View Logic, some Business Logic and some Storage. This is a Full Stack on its own, on the client. Modern, component-oriented UI frameworks, together with state-action paradigms (like Flux and its most popular implementation, Redux) have formalized a lot of new concepts. And this radically changes the way we think our architecture. How do we distribute our business logic? How do we keep things in sync? Do we actually need a backend? How do we keep components reusable? A lot of new practices have emerged and we feel that Relay will be the next big thing. We are shifting to a development environment that will give us more and more resources to focus on what really matters: the user, the experience, the product. Let's get ready for the next leap.

About the speaker:

Luca is a (very curious) Full Stack Developer. After travelling across Europe studying Computer Science and Theater in Italy, Spain and France, he landed in Montpellier, where he is currently working on Kuzzle.io, an open-source, self-hostable, ready-to-use backend solution. His daily work involves Node.js (a lot), Docker, ElasticSearch, Redis, Webpack, AngularJS, VueJS, a lot of testing, a lot of writing and a lot of meeting. He is also the UX guy of the team. That is during the day. As the sun goes down, he is a professional storyteller working in theaters, libraries, bookstores and schools.

Talk given at Full Stack Fest 2016 (https://www.fullstackfest.com)

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Recorded at: September 8, 2016
Date Posted: December 5, 2016

Traditional architectures are no longer suitable for the increasing needs of today's applications. The price is often paid in high bandwidth and reduced performance. Demand-driven design enables clients to request arbitrary data on demand. Companies like Facebook and Netflix have switched to demand-driven architectures to better embrace a great variety of continuously changing clients. Solutions like Relay and Falcor/JSONGraph distill such ideas. Om Next builds on, and extends these concepts further, to provide a Clojure(Script) based solution. In this talk, I present the motivation for a demand-driven approach and explore the benefits and tradeoffs that Om Next brings to the table.

About the speaker:

António is a software engineer currently living in Germany. He's fascinated by functional programming and Clojure in particular. He is a contributor to the Om project, and has lately been helping companies build new, demand-driven systems using Om Next.

Talk given at Full Stack Fest 2016

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Viewed 8 times
Recorded at: September 8, 2016
Date Posted: December 5, 2016

Learn how to building an internal component library & style guide can help your company ship and iterate faster. This talk will cover how we created a scalable & maintainable UI library (http://ux.mulesoft.com) with ES6, React, and PostCSS for consumption across multiple product teams.

About the speaker:

TL;DR – Marketer turned developer + entrepreneur. Full stack javascript developer in San Francisco. Founded Inbound Now (now advisor), where he makes open source marketing software that runs on over 40,000 sites. Before that, he consulted with hundreds of companies helping them implement conversion optimization strategies to increase inbound web leads. You could call him a jack of all trades and a master of some. JavaScript, Node, HTML, CSS, Marketing, UI and UX are his jam.

Talk given at Full Stack Fest 2016 (https://www.fullstackfest.com)

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Recorded at: September 9, 2016
Date Posted: December 5, 2016

At not so distant future human race will be able to make a colony on Mars, and we'll need a stable communication between the planets. Interplanetary internet works differently (ie. 3.5 to 22 mins delay between planets), so what from today's technologies can we use to build an interplanetary web app?

About the speaker:

Slobodan Stojanović is (mostly) JavaScript and node.js programmer from Belgrade, Serbia. For the past 5 years, he works as a CTO of Montreal based software development agency Cloud Horizon. Co-organizer of JS Belgrade meetups and workshops. He is passionate about offline web, chat bots , and JavaScript and node.js in general.

Talk given at Full Stack Fest 2016 (https://www.fullstackfest.com)

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Recorded at: September 9, 2016
Date Posted: December 5, 2016

WebAssembly is a new portable, size- and load-time-efficient format suitable for compilation to the web. It's efficient, fast, portable, and safe—as is the rest of the web—and the devil of how this is done is in the details. Let's walk through the diverse tech stacks which makes this possible, from high-level languages such as C++, to compilers, virtual machines, and hardware implementations.

About the speaker:

Ben Smith is a software engineer at Google on the Native Client team. Prior to Google he developed tools for video games.

Talk given at Full Stack Fest 2016 (https://www.fullstackfest.com)

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Recorded at: September 9, 2016
Date Posted: December 5, 2016

The Physical Web is a very simple idea: find URLs around you easily. However, this unassuming idea unlocks a whole new open ecosystem. As the web gets better, it makes the Physical Web look brilliant, but honestly, it's the web that's being awesome, the Physical Web is just getting a free ride. This talk will discuss some of the amazing concepts and future directions from the web community that are making the Physical Web look so promising.

About the speaker:

Scott Jenson has been doing user interface design and strategic planning for over 25 years. He worked at Apple on System 7, Newton, and the Apple Human Interface guidelines. He was UX director of Symbian, VP of product design for Cognima, managed mobile UX for Google and was a creative director at frog design in San Francisco. Scott returned to Google in November 2013 to lead the Physical Web project. As a battle-scarred veteran of the software industry, Scott has shipped a consumer spreadsheet, been a part of 2 Mac OS releases, 5 Newton product cycles, 4 commercial website revisions, designed 3 different mobile phone UIs, sworn at innumerable mobile browsers, and has over 20 patents.

Talk given at Full Stack Fest 2016 (https://www.fullstackfest.com)

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Recorded at: September 9, 2016
Date Posted: December 5, 2016

Keeping JavaScript from interfering across tabs is great, but what about when a web application wants to share state without a server? You'll leave this talk with enough knowledge to get started with SharedWorkers, ServiceWorkers, and other techniques - and enough wisdom to know when to use them.

About the speaker:

Andrew, a front-end developer at Harvest, is in his eleventh year of being amazed that his JavaScript functions. He's a former resident of Chicago and Kansas City, but now works from his home in Washington, DC. In his free time, he likes to help out with his local tech communities as an organizer of his local node.js meetup (formerly in Kansas City, currently in Washington, DC).

Talk given at Full Stack Fest 2016 (https://www.fullstackfest.com)

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Recorded at: September 9, 2016
Date Posted: December 5, 2016

2016 has brought the launch of consumer-level desktop virtual reality technologies for the first time, and how we experience data and information is shifting into 3D. Today's web technologies are shaping the future of the VR web and bringing immersive experiences to support cross-platform, device-agnostic virtual reality experiences right in the browser. In this talk, we'll cover the experimental WebVR API and how new libraries and frameworks are developing to support immersive technologies that work on devices from Google Cardboard to the Oculus Rift, as well as how new virtual reality applications are using JavaScript and WebGL to enable user-generated content.

About the speaker:

Liv Erickson is a Virtual and Augmented Reality Developer Evangelist at Microsoft based out of the San Francisco Bay Area. She is the creator and host of Just A/VR Show, a web show for aspiring VR and AR developers, developer of KittenVR, and the author of The Matrix is My Office blog. Liv is passionate about making immersive technologies accessible to everyone, and teaching new developers how to create their own VR & AR experiences. Most recently, she has co-organized the AR/VR Women meetup group and founded the MultiReality Academy, a program designed to help provide an overview of the immersive technology industry for aspiring creators.

Talk given at Full Stack Fest 2016 (https://www.fullstackfest.com)

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Viewed 5 times
Recorded at: September 9, 2016
Date Posted: December 5, 2016

Software deals with complex control flow mechanisms like callbacks, promises, events, and streams. Chosen solution has a deep impact on your code. Things can be simplified to a single abstraction since the underlying problem to all of this is the same, with CSP and the concept of channels.

About the speaker:

Vincenzo Chianese is an Italian software developer currently working for Apiary.io. He puts bugs in the code, making sure that his coworkers have always something to fix.

Talk given at Full Stack Fest 2016 (https://www.fullstackfest.com)

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Viewed 4 times
Recorded at: September 9, 2016
Date Posted: December 5, 2016

Building User Interfaces is hard. Building them in 3D worlds (virtual reality) is harder. Building them mixing 2D and 3D elements in a web browser is literally a technology frontier project. Doing it maintaining the API and developer friendliness of ReactJS... is what I'll show!

About the speaker:

Software engineer, mostly interested in programming languages and compilers. Started as a Javascript hater but this changed after he worked in the V8 team in Google for about one year and half. Now, among other things, he is working on a virtual reality system for business events on the web: Hyperfair, transitioning it to WebGL and mobile platforms.

Talk given at Full Stack Fest 2016 (https://www.fullstackfest.com)