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DevconTLV Feb 2013 Schedule

February 14, 2013

( 22 available presentations )
Introduction to campus tlv amir shevat thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 272 times
Recorded at: February 14, 2013
Date Posted: February 25, 2014

Html5 and google cloud ido green thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 317 times
Recorded at: February 14, 2013
Date Posted: February 25, 2014

In this talk Ido will cover Google cloud (new) services and some of the latest HTML5 APIs. With the combination of these APIs and the cloud technologies there is a good chance you will be happier and your users will smile more.

Developing in public david hengeveld thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 258 times
Recorded at: February 14, 2013
Date Posted: February 25, 2014

When we work together on software, we expect that our collaborators will share their code in a way that makes it easy for us to see what they've been working on.

We should have the same expectation for other artifacts of software development like environment setup, deployment, and discussions about what we're building.

Better concurrency yardana meymann thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 284 times
Recorded at: February 14, 2013
Date Posted: February 25, 2014

The talk will present Scala language features and libraries that address multithreading in a novel way. It will demonstrate some advantages of actor concurrency model through real life examples of using the Akka framework.

The best programming language damien katz thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 288 times
Recorded at: February 14, 2013
Date Posted: February 25, 2014

Sometimes people get dogmatic about programming languages. But the longer I program, the more I realize that there is room for anumber of different choices, depending on your technology, your team, and where you are in terms of project maturity.

I'd like to share some of my recent experiences to illustrate how to really pick the right programming language for your project and needs.

Clojure ronen narkis thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 583 times
Recorded at: February 14, 2013
Date Posted: February 25, 2014

Hadoop is a great tool for large scale data processing still it brings a lot of complexity to the table.

From Hardware requirements to the mental model required for writing jobs and day to day tasks like testing and deployment.

Using Clojure and Amazon EMR offers a great path to overcome these challenges, In this talk will cover:

* Main motivation, Why Clojure + Hadoop will make you work faster.
* Clojure Hadoop library, cutting off boilerplate.
* Amazon EMR, intro and main benefits.
* Using Lemure for job launching.
* Performance tuning and benchmarking (using Critirium).
* Cascalog, declarative query engine.
* Main pitfalls and tips.

Schemas armin ronacher thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 300 times
Recorded at: February 14, 2013
Date Posted: February 25, 2014

This talk briefly discusses what Fireteam's new internal queue based
architecture looks like, what benefits it has and how it differs from
similar architectures that came before.

It summarizes how to build such a system with Python and how to extend it to other languages.

Scala best practices tomer gabel thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 332 times
Recorded at: February 14, 2013
Date Posted: February 25, 2014

Although Scala has been gaining tremendous traction over the last couple of years, it's still a relatively new language with few "common knowledge" best- and worst-practices.

This lecture will attempt to distill working knowledge from 1.5 years of production Scala use, articles from around the web and other sources into a coherent set of recommendations for those considering Scala, as well as existing practitioners.

Welcome to hell baruch sadogursky thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 259 times
Recorded at: February 14, 2013
Date Posted: February 25, 2014

Build tool, CI server and binary repository are the cornerstones of building modular software.
In this keynote we will show how they should be used to support modular software development in a way which allows dependency management, full traceability and automation of build, staging and release procedures.

Functional programming 101 in groovy evgeny goldin thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 337 times
Recorded at: February 14, 2013
Date Posted: February 25, 2014

You may have heard of functional programming. Modern languages like Scala and Clojure made it a hot topic in software developer communities. But what is functional programming? Why would you want to use it? And what does Groovy provide to let you program functionally?

In this session I'm going to introduce you to the idea of a functional programming with a concrete example. We'll start with a an application solving a real-life problem and programmed in imperative (read "traditional") Groovy. We'll then transform it to a functional style making it shorter, more readable, extendable and better performing along the way. We'll then review the basic building blocks of functional programming such as immutable data, stateless functions free of side-effects, use of recursion, closures and higher-order functions, seeing how each concept is applicable in Groovy. We'll see how functional programming may contribute to application performance through parallel computations. And since no technology is ever perfect we'll discuss what could be the possible drawbacks of a functional style and which way to overcome them. I'll provide a set of patterns you can use to identify blocks of an imperative Groovy code as an immediate candidates for a conversion to a functional style. Finally, we're going to conclude the session with more examples from my own projects where a functional style was just the ideal thing to use.

By the end of this session you'll be able to see what functional programming is good for, why it is such an important part of today's computing world and what can you do next to climb aboard.

Api driven kenneth reitz thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 307 times
Recorded at: February 14, 2013
Date Posted: February 25, 2014

This talk focuses on developer/user interaction, the philosophy behind the code we write, service oriented architecture, and layering APIs.

Streaming bi haggai shachar thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 271 times
Recorded at: February 14, 2013
Date Posted: February 25, 2014

Paypal s services assaf perry thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 281 times
Recorded at: February 14, 2013
Date Posted: February 25, 2014

Products that will be reviewed in the talk:

1. The Basic PayPal products, one-time payment: express checkout, WPS.

2. Fix monthly fee / recurring payments .

3. Billing agreement.

4. Special payments ....

Better products through typography idan gazit thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 267 times
Recorded at: February 14, 2013
Date Posted: February 25, 2014

If you’re building a product, a little bit of good typography can have a lot of impact. We invest a ton of effort engineering solutions that improve our products—better caching, more efficient databases, partial pageloads for faster rendering. As developers, we often ignore the non-engineering improvements we can make to our products because we don’t know enough about them.

Design is a discipline, and every developer should know a little bit about it—just like you know a little bit about many topics that impact the products you are building. Design is just another tool in your development toolbox.

Whether you are building products for the screen or for print, type is often the main channel of communication between your product and your users. Modern typography has a rich history dating back to the invention of movable type in 1450 A.D., but many lessons were lost when type made the jump to the screen. The talk will be a mix of theory and practical advice on using type to direct and delight users' brains.

Applying unix stas krichevsky thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 290 times
Recorded at: February 14, 2013
Date Posted: February 25, 2014

This talk is about Kontera's approach to backend architecture. How it allows us to develop new applications and adopt new technologies quickly and efficiently

Wix 30m aviran mordo thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 272 times
Recorded at: February 14, 2013
Date Posted: February 25, 2014

Doing it angled thorben shroder thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 370 times
Recorded at: February 14, 2013
Date Posted: February 25, 2014

My talks gives you a brief intro into the world of AngularJS first before I walk you through the learnings we've had here at Quarter Spiral while building our new product with AngularJS.

It covers the best-practices and anti-patterns of how to get you started on Angular, grow and deploy your app. In addition to that I will give insight on how we use Angular with our Ruby backends and what problems we've faced in their collaboration.

In a last part I will cover testing scenarios with Angular.

Python introduction sim zacks thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 268 times
Recorded at: February 14, 2013
Date Posted: February 25, 2014

One of the exciting features of the Postgresql open source database engine is the ability to write stored procedures or functions in Python. Integrating python code directly into the database gives the database engine unprecedented power. For example, a function can check the server's file system to see if a file exists. This can be done on a database trigger, when a field containing a file name is added or updated, it can give the user an error if the file doesn't exist. A delete trigger can call python code to check references and delete a file from the file system if it is no longer needed. Other examples include: sending emails, FTPing files, processing data in a simpler manner then is possible using extended SQL syntax typically used in database functions.

There are tremendous advantages in writing database functions directly in Python. The ability increases the power of the database so that it is not tied down to strictly data access. In certain circumstances, it can be used as an application server, by putting your business logic inside database functions. This has to be managed correctly so that MVC principles are adhered to.

The agile tribe war gil zelberfeld thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 266 times
Recorded at: February 14, 2013
Date Posted: February 25, 2014

In the beginning there was the Agile Manifesto, and everything looked peachy. And then the universe exploded.

10 years later, we’re in the (post?) agile era, where different tribes are off to win the “we were right” cup. There are the craftsmen, scrum people, lean people, the post-agilists, and everyone else in the middle trying to make sense of this thing called Agile, what really works and how much it really costs.

How come the agile principles that were supposed to be the Great Unifying Theory of software, opened a tribal war we’ve been seeing the last few years? Is agile the real answer, or simply a filler between the waterfall and the next hotness?

Join me in a travel through time, to piece together a puzzle of politics, money, intrigue, and yes, even software, and come up with a better understanding of what the hell really happened here and where we're going from here..

Geeks and music jan krutisch thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 283 times
Recorded at: February 14, 2013
Date Posted: February 25, 2014

The agile kanban askathon yuval yeret thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 256 times
Recorded at: February 15, 2013
Date Posted: February 25, 2014

Dynamic crowd-sourced session The objective of the session is to answer a broad set of questions the audience cares most about.

We will use a mix of "Kanban Agenda Meetings" to manage a dynamic agenda,
Innovation Games to raise and prioritize the questions, Pomodoro to have short sprints for answering each question.

Come pitch your questions and get them answered by one of the leading agile/kanban experts in Israel, who's helped countless organizations do agile the right way in the last couple of years.

Expect NO slides, Lots of post-it notes, and heavy usage of flip charts, walls and probably windows...

How to create dror helper thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 246 times
Recorded at: February 15, 2013
Date Posted: February 25, 2014

In the last year I've been responsible of agile adoption in my team. When I started we had near to nothing and today after a year we're on the right track and improving every day. In this talk I'll discuss what worked for me and how my team became agile - one step at a time.

I'd like to share what worked and what didn't work for me and how I enlisted my fellow developers to the task of becoming an agile team.