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Alterconf original

Alter Conf Detroit 2015 Schedule

October 17, 2015

( 6 available presentations )
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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 183 times
Recorded at: October 17, 2015
Date Posted: October 23, 2015

How fixing the world’s broken financaial system can change the lives of marginalized women.

Women all over the world are, on average, awesome at money—they save, pay back loans, and make good financial decisions. However, structural inequalities prevent women from participating fully in the global economy.
Women are significantly less able access to economic services that let them independently better their own lives, as systemic barriers exclude them from formal financial systems.

Stellar.org's Eva Gantz will explore how an open financial network for the world can help fix this. Learn how you can help change the future of women & money.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 140 times
Recorded at: October 17, 2015
Date Posted: October 23, 2015

In this presentation we discuss advocacy writing and multimedia work done through the Not Your Mama’s Gamer’s blog, podcast, Twitter, and other social media platforms, and we do so via the specific (something) of the Invisibility Blues project, from inception through funding and the early stages of production and response.

We will look at the original series of posts on the history of racist imagery in animation and the upcoming video game, Cuphead, as a catalyst for a larger project that became Invisibility Blues, a video series that looks at race and racial representation in video games. The speakers will discuss how they conceived of the Kickstarter project that is ultimately funding the series, reactions to the Kickstarter and the videos themselves, and how they see the Invisibility Blues project affecting the games community directly and indirectly.

Ethical, advocacy-focused communication is essential in a world dominated by new media and social media, and with the particular intricacies of discussing and demonstrating issues in gaming, video is imperative to engage with a medium that is relies on interactivity. It makes available the kinds of writing and inquiry that were previously inaccessible to many, and that access is a necessary action that inspires further action. As academics, we are in a unique position to make our work relevant to the communities we serve through fighting for positive social change. Through NYMG we have done and continue to do this work, creating an organic nexus between the overlapping worlds of gaming and social advocacy.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 80 times
Recorded at: October 17, 2015
Date Posted: October 23, 2015

I am the co-organizer of the #ILookLikeAnEngineer billboard/ad campaign now going up around San Francisco, Palo Alto, and Oakland and was also the organizer and host of our event on diversity and inclusion in technical communities. I'd love to give a talk on my experiences with #ILLAE, and the purpose of our awareness campaign, which aims to show the many human faces of engineering (all ages, genders, racial background, educational backgrounds, etc) in an effort to help people see themselves in the tech careers that can often be so unwelcoming to underrepresented groups.

The campaign certainly doesn't solve the larger problems with hiring, pipeline, retention, education, etc, which are largely corporate issues, but starting an awareness campaign was one thing Michelle, Isis, and I knew we could accomplish as individuals, to change the perception/face of the diversity in tech discussions, and attempt to break stereotypes a small but important way.
Even seeing myself in a tech career is something I struggle with (despite very much being IN a tech career). I come from a nontraditional background (education, history), didn't start coding until I was 28, and am largely self taught. I hesitate to even call myself an engineer.

The #ILookLikeAnEngineer campaign seeks to break down the artificial barriers (degree, seniority, founder credentials, etc) created by the industry, and the stereotypes created by the larger public (race, gender, age, etc) and says loudly: if you write software, you ARE a software engineer, and are already *exactly* what an engineer should look like.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 155 times
Recorded at: October 17, 2015
Date Posted: October 23, 2015

Incidences of violence in our communities over the past several decades have culminated to create hostile and unwelcoming climates for people who don’t experience the privileges of the majority. While we make concerted efforts to recruit new women and people of color, retention rates are much lower than their white men peers. Centering my talk on sexual violence and gender constructs, particularly contemporary masculinities, I’ll provide specific actions we can take in order to make our spaces less toxic for the women and people of color already in our communities.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 153 times
Recorded at: October 17, 2015
Date Posted: October 23, 2015

What happens when people in Silicon Valley and others spread all throughout the world band together to use technology for people startups typically overlook? Amazing things. Tiffani Ashley Bell, the Executive Director and co-founder of the Detroit Water Project, talks about lessons learned in using tech to help with non-first world problems.

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Rating: Everyone
Viewed 206 times
Recorded at: October 17, 2015
Date Posted: October 23, 2015

Remote work and flexible schedules are a privilege of the tech world. Removing the expectation of everyone working the same hours and allowing workers to choose the times they can best contribute can promote a healthier workplace. Remote work and flexible work both have the potential to remove many of the barriers associated with stricter work environments. This helps people with physical and mental disabilities, caregivers, and others have greater flexibility to feel comfortable contributing meaningful work. But building a healthy, flexible workplace also demands shifting the culture to acknowledge how biases and oppressions intersect with how we view and treat others in the workplace. I will discuss how having a flexible, remote schedule and teammates willing to work together through biases helped me make it through a difficult year and find joy in my career.